12 Results Found

Agriculture in the Red River Colony

Morton, W. L.. 1948. Agriculture in the Red River Colony. Canadian Historical Review, Vol. 30 (December). [ pp. 304-21 ]

Analysis of Botanical Samples from The Forks, Winnipeg

Moyle, Joy M.. 1989. Analysis of Botanical Samples from The Forks, Winnipeg. Ottawa:Historic Resource Conservation Branch, National Historic Parks and Sites Directorate. Prepared for Prepared for Mary Ann-Tisdale and Kevin Lunn, Archaeological Services, Prairie Region. [ (PC) ]

Aspects of Ethnobotany in the Red River Settlement in the late 19th Century

This study uses ethnobotany to compare the socioeconomic status between the Métis and the individuals at Upper Fort Garry. The three sites used for this analysis are Upper Fort Garry and two Métis farms along the Red River (Delorme House and the Garden Site). The topics discussed are: The Red River Settlement AD 1845 – 1882, The Archaeological Sites, Archaeological Expectations (1. fruit and nuts [tomato, watermelon, plum, peach, Brazil, almond, walnut, pecan] & 2. charcoal), and Site Comparison and Discussion. There is a map of Southern Manitoba in 1858 and comparison charts.
Shay, C. Thomas. 1983. Aspects of Ethnobotany in the Red River Settlement in the late 19th Century. In Status, Structure and Stratification: Current Archaeological Reconstructions. Calgary:Proceedings of the 16th Annual Chacmool Conference, Calgary. [ pp365-370 Article (FNHSC, UW) ]
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Aspects of Fur Trade Ethnobotany in Western Canada

Ethnobotany is used to study two fur trade situations, to determine if the use of native and imported plants were dictated by environment, economic and/or social factors. There is an Introduction, and sections on The Early Fur Traders and The Hudson’s Bay Company Elite.
Shay, C. Thomas. 1993. Aspects of Fur Trade Ethnobotany in Western Canada. Manitoba Archaeological Journal. 3(1&2): 6-15. [ Journal article (FNHSC, MAS, UM, UW) ]
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Faunal Analysis of The Forks (Winnipeg) (21K1 to 21K6)

This report on the analysis of faunal material recovered from Parks Canada’s 1984 excavations at The Forks records information on species, skeletal element, modification, and minimum numbers of individuals. The data is used to provide information on the butchering techniques and diet as well as seasonality and lifestyle.
Smith, Pamela J.. 1985. Faunal Analysis of The Forks (Winnipeg) (21K1 to 21K6). Ottawa:Environment Canada, Parks Service. [ Research monograph (PC) ]
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Faunal Analysis of Upper Fort Garry: Social and Economic Implications

This thesis looks at faunal recoveries from Upper Fort Garry (DlLg-21). Over 5000 specimens were analysed with the goals of reconstructing the pattern of animal utilisation during the occupation of the fort; comparing this reconstruction with historical and archaeological records of animal use in the Red River Settlement (mid-a800s); and examination of how diet and economic position relate. Identification of the faunal remains, and archival and documentary investigations determined animal utilisation differed in terms of species and selected body parts and that varied social and economic contexts are reflected in chosen food items. It is concluded that faunal remains can be used in considering economic position of consumers, thus enhancing interpretation of Upper Fort Garry.
Seyers, Linda. 1988. Faunal Analysis of Upper Fort Garry: Social and Economic Implications. Winnipeg:M.A. thesis, Department of Anthropology, University of Manitoba. [ Thesis (189pp.)(MM, UM) ]
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Faunal Exploitation at The Forks: 3000 B.P. to 1860 AD

This thesis documents analysis of faunal assemblages from The Forks, spanning the Archaic (Hanna), Late Woodland (Blackduck), and Fur Trade (Fort Gibraltar I, Fort Garry, and Upper Fort Garry) periods. Archaeological and documentary information regarding subsistence are compared for a better understanding of the following: faunal exploitation; possible areas of disagreement and bias; and explanations for faunal exploitation pattern changes at a stable locality. From the analysis it was determined that there is a high degree of variability among the samples. The comparative data identified the following factors affecting resource use patterns at The Forks: technology, length of occupation (nomadic vs. tade focus), and nature of subsistence economy (focused vs. diffuse).
Peach, A. Kate. 1999. Faunal Exploitation at The Forks: 3000 B.P. to 1860 AD . Winnipeg:Department of Anthropology, University of Manitoba. [ Thesis (447pp.)(UM, MM) ]
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Paleobotanical Studies at The Forks: Analysis of Seeds, Charcoal and other Organic Remains (1990)

This is a study of thirty-five soil samples, from Parks Canada’s excavation at The Forks in 1984 and 1988. The purpose of this paper is to determine what plants were growing at The Forks, and how they were used. The study is divided into two periods: BC 4000 to AD 1780, then AD 1780 to the present. The article discusses the Methods used (vegetation survey, collection of sediment samples, processing and data analysis); Environment and Plant Resources (vegetation survey results, climate, landforms and hydrology, soils, natural habitats and distribution of plants in early historic times, plant resources, environmental history over the past 1500 years, predicted plant use at The Forks); Past Environments and Ethnobotany (the samples, reconstruction of past soils, vegetation and ethnobotany, comparison with seed remains found at other northern plains sites).
Shay, C.Thomas, S. Coyston, H. Isfeld, M. Waddell, and D.M. Deck. 1990. Paleobotanical Studies at The Forks: Analysis of Seeds, Charcoal and other Organic Remains (1990). Winnipeg. [ Research report (54pp) ]
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Paleobotanical Studies at The Forks: Analysis of Seeds, Charcoal and Other Organic Remains (1991)

This is a study of thirty-five soil samples, from Parks Canada’s excavation at The Forks in 1984 and 1988. The purpose of this paper is to determine what plants were growing at The Forks, and how they were used. The study is divided into two periods: BC 4000 to AD 1780, then AD 1780 to the present. The article discusses the Methods used (vegetation survey, collection of sediment samples, processing and data analysis); Environment and Plant Resources (vegetation survey results, climate, landforms and hydrology, soils, natural habitats and distribution of plants in early historic times, plant resources, environmental history over the past 1500 years, predicted plant use at The Forks); Past Environments and Ethnobotany (the samples, reconstruction of past soils, vegetation and ethnobotany, comparison with seed remains found at other northern plains sites). There are maps, diagrams, plant/seed lists. Appendix 1 is about Flotation, processing and analysis, Appendix 2 with notes on distribution and interpretation.
Shay, C.Thomas, S. Coyston, H. Isfeld, and M. Waddell. 1991. Paleobotanical Studies at The Forks: Analysis of Seeds, Charcoal and Other Organic Remains. Manitoba Archaeological Journal. 1(1): 62-92. [ Journal article (FNHSC, HRB, MAS, MM) ]