30 Results Found

A 3000 Year Old Native Campsite and Trade Centre at The Forks

Contributions by 10 authors detail the 1992 public archaeology investigations of the 3000-year-old occupation horizon yielding 80,490 artifacts (80% fish remains). A brief historical background covers the First Inhabitants (8000 BC - AD 1737) including Archaic (3000 BC - AD 1) and Woodland (AD 1 - 1737); Contact (1737-1821) including Fort Gibraltar I (1810-1816); Transition (1821-1870); Industrialization and Immigration (1870-1888) and Railway (1888-1988) Periods. Analysis covers operations; stratigraphy and features; dendrochronological analysis of oak pilings, lithic artifacts; charcoal and seeds; faunal, fish, shellfish and snail recoveries. Interpretation includes discussion of the Hudson's Bay Flour Mill complex (1847-1907) and the people, activiiteis and environment of the 3000-year-old campsite.
Kroker, Sid, and Pam Goundry (compilers). 1993. A 3000 Year Old Native Campsite and Trade Centre at The Forks. Winnipeg:The Forks Public Archaeology Association. [ Research monograph (268pp)(FNHSC, TFNP pdf, MM, on file at PC) ]
View Source (new window)

A Brief Note on Some Artifacts Found at The Forks

The Public Archaeology Program at The Forks produced artifacts, such as bricks, buttons, beads, rings, lead pellets and pipes.
Thomson, Sharon. 1990. A Brief Note on Some Artifacts Found at The Forks. Manitoba Archaeological Newsletter. Ser. 2, 2(3): 4-5. [ Newsletter article (PC, UM, MM) ]
View Source (new window)

A History of the Structures of Upper Fort Garry

This research monograph discusses the architecture of Upper Fort Garry from the viewpoint of the economic and political situations. The history of the building is looked at, with the date of construction, the occupants, the function of the building, and the impacts involved. The monograph begins with an Introduction, then is divided into sections: 1) Construction for Retail (Fur Trade Administration and Civil Government: 1835-46, Functions and Overview of Construction, Stores, Dwelling Houses, Walls and Bastions); 2) The Effects of Military Occupation 1846-49 (Overview of Construction and Sources, Renovations inside the Fort, Stores, Walls and Bastions); 3) Competition 1849-57 (Construction, Walls, Flood Damage and Drains, Office, Dwelling Houses; 4) Entrepot for the North-West 1858-70 (construction related to the Royal Canadian Rifles); 5) Decline and Demolition 1871-87 (construction and demolition, Denouement). There are also Appendices, diagrams, illustrations, floor plans, maps and photographs.
Loewen, Brad, and Greg Monks. 1986. A History of the Structures of Upper Fort Garry. Ottawa:Parks Canada, Microfiche Report no. 330.
View Source (new window)

A Parallel-Grooved Avonlea Vessel from The Forks, Winnipeg (DlLg-33)

This is an analysis of ceramic sherds recovered during the construction of the Manitoba Travel Centre. The reconstructed sherds resemble the Avonlea assemblages of Saskatchewan, Manitoba and other northern plains. The vessel is described in regard to stratigraphy, reconstruction, vessel description, decoration, dating and observations. There are drawings and photographs.
Speidel, Paul. 1996. A Parallel-Grooved Avonlea Vessel from The Forks, Winnipeg (DlLg-33). Manitoba Archaeological Journal. 6(2): 72-81. [ Journal article (MAS, MM, PC) ]
View Source (new window)

An Analysis of Bottle Glass from Upper Fort Garry

Schuerbeke, Deanna. 1988. An Analysis of Bottle Glass from Upper Fort Garry. Winnipeg:Student paper on file, Manitoba Museum. [ Student paper (43pp)(MM) ]

An Archaeological Survey of Metropolitan Winnipeg, 1968 and 1969

This article discusses the four excavations (one in the area of The Forks) conducted as a result of the survey over two seasons in 1968-1969. The sites, as well as excavation methods and recovered artifacts (from both Pre- and Postcontact Periods) are described. Each excavation is summarized, and recommendations on future research are presented. Maps and photographs of the artifacts are included.
Dickson, Gary. 1979. An Archaeological Survey of Metropolitan Winnipeg, 1968 and 1969. Manitoba Archaeological Quarterly. [ 3(3&4): 2-29. (MM) ]
View Source (new window)

Archaeology and Flood Deposits at The Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

The topic of this paper is how the flooding of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers has long and short term effects on topography, flora and fauna. The floods of 1826,1852, 1861 and 1882 are discussed, along with the Northwest Company’s Fort Gibraltar I and the Hudson’s Bay Company’s Experimental Farm. There are photographs and drawings of stratigraphy.
Kroker, Sid. 1997. Archaeology and Flood Deposits at The Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. In Proceedings of the North Dakota Academy of Science, 12-16. Edited by Joseph H. Hartman. [ Section in research monograph (QC) ]
View Source (new window)

Architectural Symbolism and Non-Verbal Communication at Upper Fort Garry

The author states there are transformations in the architecture of Upper Fort Garry during its occupancy (1836-1881) due to economic and social changes. The first topic discusses the history of the area: the Fur Trade (Hudson’s Bay Company 1767-1821), Fort Gibraltar I (1810), The Northwest Company, the Selkirk Settlement, and Fort Douglas. This section also explores the problems of food costs, crop failures, the merging of the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Northwest Company, and the hierarchy of the people (religious and nationality). The rest of the topics are as follows: Analysis of Upper Fort Garry; External Communication Form (comparing Lower and Upper Fort Garry); External Communication: Space; Internal Communication: Form and Space; and a Summary and Conclusion.
Monks, Gregory G.. 1992. Architectural Symbolism and Non-Verbal Communication at Upper Fort Garry. Historical Archaeology. 26(2): 37-57. [ Journal article (FNHSC, MM) ]
View Source (new window)

Ceramics as Indicators of Economic Variation in the Red River Settlement

This thesis looks at economic variability among five historic sites in the Red River region: Upper and Lower Forts Garry, Riel House, Delorme House, and the Garden Site. Analysis assesses the visibility of economic variation in the archaeological record using both mean index values, and Kenyon and Kenyon's method, to examine the ceramic assemblages frm the selected sites using intersite and intrasite comparisons. These methods determine that economic variation is discernable at historical archaeological sites through the comparison of ceramic artifact assemblages.
Larcombe, Linda. 1988. Ceramics as Indicators of Economic Variation in the Red River Settlement. M.A. thesis, Department of Anthropology, University of Manitoba. [ Thesis (145pp.)(MM) ]
View Source (new window)